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European humanism

European history seen through culture, representations, and socio-religious identities.

Editorial managers: Denis Crouzet and Séverin Duc.

Extract of Le Canzoniere or Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, collection of 366 poems of Pétrarque.
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Portrait of Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam, by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/1498–1543).

Humanism was a cultural movement that developed rapidly in Italy in the fourteenth century before spreading throughout early modern Europe. Based on a return to the authors of antiquity, advocating the renewal of the study of the humanities (the studia humanitatis) and putting forward a new vision of the place of man in the world, it gradually became a dominant cultural model throughout the continent. The terms Renaissance, humanism and Europe are often closely associated. But to which Europe are we referring? Did people at the time really have a feeling of belonging to Europe? Even if we have undoubtedly inherited a certain idea of Europe from the Renaissance, which ideas did it encompass at that time? From a Christian Europe governed by the pope to a Europe of confederations, from a Europe of plural identities to a new humanist Europe République des lettres, a wide range of projects for Europe were put forward between dreams, hopes and disillusionment.

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